Skip to content
Article

The Old Hand Problem

By Xiao Wang | January 31, 2023

By Xiao Wang. Full Text. Senior status is a special form of retirement for federal judges. When a judge takes senior status, they open a vacancy on their court, yet continue to hear and decide cases. Most active judges today eventually go senior. Yet many do not do so the very moment they become eligible.…

Read More
Article

Deals in the Heartland: Renewable Energy Projects, Local Resistance, and How Law Can Help

By Christiana Ochoa, Kacey Cook, and Hanna Weil | January 31, 2023

By Christiana Ochoa, Kacey Cook, and Hanna Weil. Full Text. Rural communities in every windblown and sun-drenched region of the United States are enmeshed in legal, political, and social conflicts related to the country’s rapid transition to renewable energy. Organized local opposition has foreclosed millions of acres from renewable energy development, impeding national and state-level…

Read More
Article

“Can You Hear Me Now?”: The Right to Counsel Prior to Execution of a Cell Phone Search Warrant

By Nathaniel Mensah | January 31, 2023

By Nathaniel Mensah. Full Text. As advances in technology allow law enforcement to gain ever more expansive surveillance powers, the criminal justice system scrambles to keep up. The Fourth Amendment has been the primary vehicle through which modern criminal procedure has adapted to new technologies. That limited approach risks undue harm to criminal defendants and…

Read More
Article

Americans, Beyond States and Territories

By Tom C.W. Lin | January 31, 2023

By Tom C.W. Lin. Full Text. For over a century, the law has systemically marginalized over three million Americans living in the unincorporated Territories of the United States. The law has long defined the Territories homogenously and subserviently to States. It has segregated the rights and privileges of citizenship between those living in States and…

Read More
Article

Public Law, Private Platforms

By Andrew Keane Woods | January 31, 2023

By Andrew Keane Woods. Full Text. Our law—both our constitutional law and much of our statutory law—has long drawn a fraught distinction between public and private domains. Indeed, debates about the public/private distinction date as far back as liberalism itself. But today’s private digital platforms strain that distinction to a new degree. Platforms have become…

Read More
Note

School Curricula and Silenced Speech: A Constitutional Challenge to Critical Race Theory Bans

By Dylan Saul | January 31, 2023

By Dylan Saul. Full Text. In 2021, conservative politicians, activists, and media personalities ignited a culture war over teaching critical race theory (CRT) in public schools. Something about this manufactured conflict struck a chord with American voters: school board meetings have devolved into screaming matches, education became a critical wedge issue in elections across the…

Read More
Note

An (Un)reasonable Expectation of Privacy? Analysis of the Fourth Amendment When Applied to Keyword Search Warrants

By Helen Winters | January 31, 2023

By Helen Winters. Full Text. In the “digital age,” perpetual changes in technology have brought increased opportunities for exchanges of personal data between individuals and third parties. Often, this information-sharing is a necessity to fully participate in modern society. Yet, investigative techniques such as reverse keyword search warrants have called into question the applicability of…

Read More

Articles, Essays, & Tributes

The Old Hand Problem

By Xiao Wang. Full Text. Senior status is a special form of retirement for federal judges. When a judge takes senior status, they open a vacancy on their court, yet continue to hear and decide cases. Most active judges today eventually go senior. Yet many do not do so the very moment they become eligible.

Deals in the Heartland: Renewable Energy Projects, Local Resistance, and How Law Can Help

By Christiana Ochoa, Kacey Cook, and Hanna Weil. Full Text. Rural communities in every windblown and sun-drenched region of the United States are enmeshed in legal, political, and social conflicts related to the country’s rapid transition to renewable energy. Organized local opposition has foreclosed millions of acres from renewable energy development, impeding national and state-level

“Can You Hear Me Now?”: The Right to Counsel Prior to Execution of a Cell Phone Search Warrant

By Nathaniel Mensah. Full Text. As advances in technology allow law enforcement to gain ever more expansive surveillance powers, the criminal justice system scrambles to keep up. The Fourth Amendment has been the primary vehicle through which modern criminal procedure has adapted to new technologies. That limited approach risks undue harm to criminal defendants and

Americans, Beyond States and Territories

By Tom C.W. Lin. Full Text. For over a century, the law has systemically marginalized over three million Americans living in the unincorporated Territories of the United States. The law has long defined the Territories homogenously and subserviently to States. It has segregated the rights and privileges of citizenship between those living in States and

Public Law, Private Platforms

By Andrew Keane Woods. Full Text. Our law—both our constitutional law and much of our statutory law—has long drawn a fraught distinction between public and private domains. Indeed, debates about the public/private distinction date as far back as liberalism itself. But today’s private digital platforms strain that distinction to a new degree. Platforms have become

Notes

An (Un)reasonable Expectation of Privacy? Analysis of the Fourth Amendment When Applied to Keyword Search Warrants

By Helen Winters. Full Text. In the “digital age,” perpetual changes in technology have brought increased opportunities for exchanges of personal data between individuals and third parties. Often, this information-sharing is a necessity to fully participate in modern society. Yet, investigative techniques such as reverse keyword search warrants have called into question the applicability of

School Curricula and Silenced Speech: A Constitutional Challenge to Critical Race Theory Bans

By Dylan Saul. Full Text. In 2021, conservative politicians, activists, and media personalities ignited a culture war over teaching critical race theory (CRT) in public schools. Something about this manufactured conflict struck a chord with American voters: school board meetings have devolved into screaming matches, education became a critical wedge issue in elections across the

Headnotes

“What Has Always Been True”: The Washington Supreme Court Decides That Seizure Law Must Account for Racial Disparity in Policing

By Aliza Hochman Bloom. Full Text. In June, the Washington Supreme Court held that courts must consider an individual’s race as part of the totality of circumstances when determining whether that individual has been seized by a police officer. Like the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, Washington’s parallel constitutional provision requires that the determination

Antitrust Reformers Should Consider the Consequences of Mandatory Treble Damages: What the Admonition Against Putting New Wine in Old Wineskins Can Teach Us About Antitrust Reform

By Henry J. Hauser, Tiffany L. Lee, and Thomas G. Krattenmaker. Full Text. The debate over antitrust reform is reaching a crescendo. Several proposals have been introduced in Congress and state legislatures to expand the scope of substantive antitrust rules governing marketplace behavior. Missing from the current discussion, however, is careful consideration of whether these

Term Limits and Embracing a Political Supreme Court

By Guha Krishnamurthi. Full Text. In the run up to the 2020 Presidential election, then-candidate Joseph R. Biden, Jr. lamented the increasing dysfunction of the United States Supreme Court and campaigned on rectifying the august institution. This was indeed part of Biden’s general message: a return to norms, normalcy, and mutual respect. The problems with

A Century of Business in the Supreme Court, 1920–2020

By Lee Epstein and Mitu Gulati. Full Text.  A decade and a half into its life, we ask: how pro-business is the Roberts Court? Using a simple objective measure—how often does business win in the Court when it is fighting a non-business—we find that the Roberts Court may be the most pro-business Court in a

Handling the Mayo Powder Keg: Emphasizing Preemption in § 101 Biotechnology Inquiries

By Zachary M. Robole. Full Text.  To incite a jury’s emotions, attorneys have stated that the “clear and convincing” evidentiary standard required to invalidate a patent is the same standard of proof required to justify taking a child away from a parent. Although such statements are likely an evidentiary rule violation, the point is illustrative

De Novo Blog

THE “MAJOR QUESTIONS” SHACKLES: PREDICTING THE OUTCOME OF DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION v. BROWN AND A WARNING ON THE POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCES OF A CONSTRAINED ADMINISTRATIVE STATE 

February 9, 2023

By: James Carlton, Volume 107 Staff Member On February 28th, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in two cases that will decide the constitutionality of President Biden’s student loan forgiveness program: Department of Education v. Brown and Biden v. Nebraska.[1] While the immediate ramifications of the Court’s decisions will be felt most directly by middle-…

OBJECTIVELY REASONABLE FRAUD?: THE SUPREME COURT’S UPCOMING FCA DECISION WILL RESOLVE CIRCUIT SPLIT OVER SCIENTER ELEMENT

February 6, 2023

By: Carly Heying, Volume 107 Staff Member  On January 13, 2023, after urging by the U.S. Solicitor General and Senator Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa),[1] the Supreme Court agreed to take up a pair of consolidated False Claims Act cases addressing “whether and when a defendant’s contemporaneous subjective understanding or beliefs about the lawfulness of its conduct…

THOMAS ON TRIAL: HOW SUPREME COURT JUSTICE CLARENCE THOMAS HAS INFLUENCED THE CURRENT AFFIRMATIVE ACTION CASES BEFORE THE COURT

January 19, 2023

By: Dahlia Wilson, Volume 107 Staff Member I. INTRODUCTION In the 2022–23 term, the Supreme Court is faced with two seminal cases regarding universities’ uses of “affirmative action”—a.k.a. the consideration of race—in their admissions practices. Both Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina[1] and Students for Fair Admissions v. President & Fellows of…

READING TO BECOME A DIFFERENT TYPE OF “PRACTICE-READY” LAWYER: WHAT NO MORE POLICE CAN TEACH LAW STUDENTS ABOUT THEIR ROLE IN THE MOVEMENT FOR PRISON-INDUSTRIAL-COMPLEX ABOLITION

January 13, 2023

By: Lucy Chin, Volume 107 Staff Member A small minority of the 1.3 million lawyers in the country engage in work that explicitly concerns community-based advocacy and movement lawyering.[1] And yet, our profession—like most in the past few years—has been unable to avoid confronting fundamental questions about our role in social justice movements.[2] In the…

NOVEL REGULATIONS AND HISTORICAL ANALOGUES: A SAN JOSÉ ORDINANCE TESTS THE BOUNDARIES OF THE SECOND AMENDMENT

January 9, 2023

By: Toph Beach, Volume 107 Staff Member On June 23, 2022, the Supreme Court decided New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, striking down a New York firearm restriction and pioneering a new test for Second Amendment cases.[1] Under Bruen, gun regulations must be “consistent with this Nation’s historical tradition of firearm regulation.”[2]…