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Article

How the Liberal First Amendment Under-Protects Democracy

By Tabatha Abu El-Haj | December 22, 2022

By Tabatha Abu El-Haj. Full Text.  This Article advances a distinct theoretical account of the First Amendment that stresses its role as the underwriter of a republican form of government. Predicated on a more accurate description of the processes of self-governance, the advanced theory delivers a construction of the First Amendment that actually protects democracy…

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Article

Essential Property

By Timothy M. Mulvaney and Joseph William Singer | December 22, 2022

By Timothy M. Mulvaney and Joseph William Singer. Full Text. For a sizable swath of the U.S. population, incomes and wealth are insufficient to cover life’s most basic necessities even in the most ordinary of times. A disturbingly resilient explanation for this state of affairs rests on the view that resource inequities are avoidable through…

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Article

Brady Lists

By Rachel Moran | December 22, 2022

By Rachel Moran. Full Text.  Brady lists, named after the Supreme Court’s 1963 decision Brady v. Maryland, are lists some prosecutors maintain of law enforcement officers with histories of misconduct that could impact the officers’ credibility. The lists serve as tools for prosecutors to track officer misconduct and disclose that information to defense counsel where…

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Article

Nonexclusive Functions and Separation of Powers Law

By Ilan Wurman | December 22, 2022

By Ilan Wurman. Full Text.  The Constitution’s text, structure, and history suggest that some governmental functions strictly and exclusively appertain to a particular branch, and to the exercise of a single vested power. Many governmental functions, however, are nonexclusive: their exercise has some combination of legislative, executive, and judicial characteristics and, as a result, can…

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Note

Say It Ain’t Roe: Dobbs and Reason Bans Are Trojan Horses for the Down Syndrome Community

By Calvin Lee | December 22, 2022

By Calvin Lee. Full Text.  In recent times, one of the most in vogue methods for curtailing abortion rights has been through the enactment of “reason bans,” statutes precluding abortions if the procedure is being sought due to the sex, race, or potential genetic abnormality of the fetus. This Note focuses on the contemporary litigation…

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Note

Minimum Deadly Contacts

By Jesse Noltimier | December 22, 2022

By Jesse Noltimier. Full Text.  Domestic violence is a national epidemic. Roughly one in three women will experience some form of domestic violence during their lifetime. Women are also seventy times more likely to be killed in the two weeks after leaving their intimate partner than at any other time during their relationship. Thus, it…

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Note

Why Are There So Many Taxes?: Teleworking and the Multiple Taxation Dilemma—Time to Standardize and Apportion

By Xiaoyuan Zhou | December 22, 2022

By Xiaoyuan Zhou. Full Text. Due in large part to the COVID-19 pandemic, remote teleworking has become the new norm for many professions. This dramatic shift in the workforce has raised serious tax concerns, and it has caused double taxation troubles for millions of remote workers. The fallout from COVID-19 continues to have a significant…

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Articles, Essays, & Tributes

How the Liberal First Amendment Under-Protects Democracy

By Tabatha Abu El-Haj. Full Text.  This Article advances a distinct theoretical account of the First Amendment that stresses its role as the underwriter of a republican form of government. Predicated on a more accurate description of the processes of self-governance, the advanced theory delivers a construction of the First Amendment that actually protects democracy

Essential Property

By Timothy M. Mulvaney and Joseph William Singer. Full Text. For a sizable swath of the U.S. population, incomes and wealth are insufficient to cover life’s most basic necessities even in the most ordinary of times. A disturbingly resilient explanation for this state of affairs rests on the view that resource inequities are avoidable through

Brady Lists

By Rachel Moran. Full Text.  Brady lists, named after the Supreme Court’s 1963 decision Brady v. Maryland, are lists some prosecutors maintain of law enforcement officers with histories of misconduct that could impact the officers’ credibility. The lists serve as tools for prosecutors to track officer misconduct and disclose that information to defense counsel where

Nonexclusive Functions and Separation of Powers Law

By Ilan Wurman. Full Text.  The Constitution’s text, structure, and history suggest that some governmental functions strictly and exclusively appertain to a particular branch, and to the exercise of a single vested power. Many governmental functions, however, are nonexclusive: their exercise has some combination of legislative, executive, and judicial characteristics and, as a result, can

Notes

Why Are There So Many Taxes?: Teleworking and the Multiple Taxation Dilemma—Time to Standardize and Apportion

By Xiaoyuan Zhou. Full Text. Due in large part to the COVID-19 pandemic, remote teleworking has become the new norm for many professions. This dramatic shift in the workforce has raised serious tax concerns, and it has caused double taxation troubles for millions of remote workers. The fallout from COVID-19 continues to have a significant

Minimum Deadly Contacts

By Jesse Noltimier. Full Text.  Domestic violence is a national epidemic. Roughly one in three women will experience some form of domestic violence during their lifetime. Women are also seventy times more likely to be killed in the two weeks after leaving their intimate partner than at any other time during their relationship. Thus, it

Say It Ain’t Roe: Dobbs and Reason Bans Are Trojan Horses for the Down Syndrome Community

By Calvin Lee. Full Text.  In recent times, one of the most in vogue methods for curtailing abortion rights has been through the enactment of “reason bans,” statutes precluding abortions if the procedure is being sought due to the sex, race, or potential genetic abnormality of the fetus. This Note focuses on the contemporary litigation

Headnotes

Handling the Mayo Powder Keg: Emphasizing Preemption in § 101 Biotechnology Inquiries

By Zachary M. Robole. Full Text.  To incite a jury’s emotions, attorneys have stated that the “clear and convincing” evidentiary standard required to invalidate a patent is the same standard of proof required to justify taking a child away from a parent. Although such statements are likely an evidentiary rule violation, the point is illustrative

“What Has Always Been True”: The Washington Supreme Court Decides That Seizure Law Must Account for Racial Disparity in Policing

By Aliza Hochman Bloom. Full Text. In June, the Washington Supreme Court held that courts must consider an individual’s race as part of the totality of circumstances when determining whether that individual has been seized by a police officer. Like the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, Washington’s parallel constitutional provision requires that the determination

Antitrust Reformers Should Consider the Consequences of Mandatory Treble Damages: What the Admonition Against Putting New Wine in Old Wineskins Can Teach Us About Antitrust Reform

By Henry J. Hauser, Tiffany L. Lee, and Thomas G. Krattenmaker. Full Text. The debate over antitrust reform is reaching a crescendo. Several proposals have been introduced in Congress and state legislatures to expand the scope of substantive antitrust rules governing marketplace behavior. Missing from the current discussion, however, is careful consideration of whether these

Term Limits and Embracing a Political Supreme Court

By Guha Krishnamurthi. Full Text. In the run up to the 2020 Presidential election, then-candidate Joseph R. Biden, Jr. lamented the increasing dysfunction of the United States Supreme Court and campaigned on rectifying the august institution. This was indeed part of Biden’s general message: a return to norms, normalcy, and mutual respect. The problems with

A Century of Business in the Supreme Court, 1920–2020

By Lee Epstein and Mitu Gulati. Full Text.  A decade and a half into its life, we ask: how pro-business is the Roberts Court? Using a simple objective measure—how often does business win in the Court when it is fighting a non-business—we find that the Roberts Court may be the most pro-business Court in a

De Novo Blog

Unprecedented

February 1, 2017

UNPRECEDENTED: PRESIDENT TRUMP’S DIVIDED LOYALTIES By: Emily Atmore, Volume 101 Staff Member Donald Trump’s prominence as an international businessman has raised widespread concerns about conflicts of interest in his newest venture: as President of the United States.[1] Legal experts have relied on a little known section of the Constitution, the Emoluments Clause, in calling on…

Reading the Tea Leaves of Pretextual Protectionism

January 26, 2017

READING THE TEA LEAVES OF PRETEXTUAL PROTECTIONISM: THE FUTURE OF THE U.S.-CUBA RELATIONSHIP By: Charles Barrera Moore, Volume 101 Lead Online Editor In the wake of the death of Cuban dictator Fidel Castro, both President Obama and President Trump acknowledged that the United States is faced with a crucial moment in its relationship with the…

When Food Turns Deadly

January 25, 2017

WHEN FOOD TURNS DEADLY: CRIMINAL LIABILITY FOR RESTAURATEURS THAT DISREGARD PATRONS FOOD ALLERGIES By: Taylor Gess, Volume 101 Staff Member On January 28, 2016, the mother of a five-year-old girl used Panera’s online ordering system to purchase a grilled cheese sandwich for her peanut-allergic daughter.[1] The order’s special instructions section stated “peanut allergy is having…

Elon Take the Wheel

January 24, 2017

ELON TAKE THE WHEEL: MAJOR CHALLENGES THAT AUTONOMOUS CARS WILL PRESENT TO THE LEGAL SYSTEM By: Stephen Maier, Volume 101 Staff Member In May 2016, 40-year-old Joshua Brown was driving a Tesla Model S in “Autopilot mode” when a semi turned in front of him.[1] The self-driving computer did not recognize the truck against the…

Re-Introducing “Stop and Frisk” or Revisiting It?

January 23, 2017

RE-INTRODUCING “STOP AND FRISK” OR REVISITING IT? By: Anabel Cassady, Volume 101 Staff Member On the evening of August 20, 2008, Leroy Downs was stopped by two plainclothes officers outside his home while making a phone call to a friend.[1] Downs was a black male in his mid-thirties living in Staten Island and working as…