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AI Tools for Lawyers: A Practical Guide

By Daniel Schwarcz & Jonathan H. Choi | October 27, 2023

By Daniel Schwarcz & Jonathan H. Choi. Full Text. This Article provides practical and specific guidance on how to effectively use AI large language models (LLMs), like GPT-4, Bing Chat, and Bard, in legal research and writing. Focusing on GPT-4—the most advanced LLM that is widely available at the time of this writing—it emphasizes that…

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Headnote

Property as a Legitimating Right

By Duncan Hosie | November 21, 2023

By Duncan Hosie. Full Text. Recent decisions from the Roberts Court have strengthened property rights, and progressive commentators and jurists have reacted with alarm. In light of these constitutional developments, this Essay revisits the landmark 2003 case of Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, which made Massachusetts the first state to recognize a right to…

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Headnote

Still on the Hook: Forward-Looking Releases Reel-in Potential Risks in Mergers and Acquisitions

By Mark T. Wilhelm & Madison Fitzgerald | December 20, 2023

By Mark T. Wilhelm & Madison Fitzgerald. Full Text. A recent study that analyzed more than 2,100 private-target acquisitions found that 65% of those transactions were structured with a separate signing and closing. While the number of days between signing and closing inevitably varies on a deal-by-deal basis, a prolonged executory period only intensifies concerns…

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Headnote

The Right to Counsel for Habeas Proceedings

By Amy Cohen | December 21, 2023

By Amy Cohen. Full Text. Federal habeas is often the last avenue of relief for both federal and state prisoners. The Framers thought the right to the writ of habeas corpus was so established in law that its only reference in the Constitution is under what conditions the right may be suspended. Yet, most habeas…

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Article

Can the Excessive Fines Clause Mitigate the LFO Crisis? An Assessment of the Caselaw

By Michael O'Hear | February 21, 2024

By Michael O’Hear. Full Text. The nation’s increasing use of fees, fines, forfeiture, and restitution has resulted in chronic debt burdens for millions of poor and working-class Americans. These legal financial obligations (LFOs) likely entrench racial and socioeconomic divides and contribute to the breakdown of trust in the police and courts in disadvantaged communities. One…

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Article

Subjective Costs of Tax Compliance

By Jonathan H. Choi and Ariel Jurow Kleiman | February 21, 2024

By Jonathan H. Choi and Ariel Jurow Kleiman. Full Text. This Article introduces and estimates the “subjective costs” of tax compliance, which are costs of tax compliance that people experience directly and individually. To measure these costs, we conducted a survey experiment assessing how much taxpayers would pay to reduce the unpleasantness associated with filing…

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Article

Making Whole, Making Better, and Accommodating Resilience

By Erik Encarnacion | February 21, 2024

By Erik Encarnacion. Full Text. The conventional story about compensatory damages is that they aim to make plaintiffs whole, but not better off. This make-whole ideal implies that courts should subtract material gains from compensatory awards because otherwise plaintiffs would be unjustly enriched. This Article undermines this conventional wisdom in three ways. First, it highlights…

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Article

The Roberts Court and the Unraveling of Labor Law

By Courtlyn G. Roser-Jones | February 21, 2024

By Courtlyn G. Roser-Jones. Full Text. Labor law comprises several doctrines and procedures that oversee the relationships between employers, unions, and the workers they represent. These doctrines—the duty of fair representation, exclusivity, good-faith bargaining, captive-audience speech, and rights of equal access—are all component threads to a tapestry designed to facilitate widespread organizing and collective bargaining.…

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Article

Multi-Parent Custody

By Jessica Feinberg | February 21, 2024

By Jessica Feinberg. Full Text. In recent years, a number of jurisdictions have enacted laws recognizing that a child may have more than two legal parents (multi-parentage). Recognition of multi-parentage represents a significant change to the legal framework governing parentage— for most of U.S. history, it was well established that a child could have a…

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Note

Throuples and Family Law

By Philip de Sa e Silva | February 21, 2024

By Philip de Sa e Silva. Full Text. As throuples and other forms of polyamorous relationships gain visibility and acceptance, courts will have to confront the legal issues that will likely arise when a throuple forms and when it dissolves. How should courts determine child custody for three equally situated parents? How should courts divide…

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Articles, Essays, & Tributes

Can the Excessive Fines Clause Mitigate the LFO Crisis? An Assessment of the Caselaw

February 21, 2024

By Michael O’Hear. Full Text. The nation’s increasing use of fees, fines, forfeiture, and restitution has resulted in chronic debt burdens for millions of poor and working-class Americans. These legal financial obligations (LFOs) likely entrench racial and socioeconomic divides and contribute to the breakdown of trust in the police and courts in disadvantaged communities. One…

Subjective Costs of Tax Compliance

February 21, 2024

By Jonathan H. Choi and Ariel Jurow Kleiman. Full Text. This Article introduces and estimates the “subjective costs” of tax compliance, which are costs of tax compliance that people experience directly and individually. To measure these costs, we conducted a survey experiment assessing how much taxpayers would pay to reduce the unpleasantness associated with filing…

Making Whole, Making Better, and Accommodating Resilience

February 21, 2024

By Erik Encarnacion. Full Text. The conventional story about compensatory damages is that they aim to make plaintiffs whole, but not better off. This make-whole ideal implies that courts should subtract material gains from compensatory awards because otherwise plaintiffs would be unjustly enriched. This Article undermines this conventional wisdom in three ways. First, it highlights…

The Roberts Court and the Unraveling of Labor Law

February 21, 2024

By Courtlyn G. Roser-Jones. Full Text. Labor law comprises several doctrines and procedures that oversee the relationships between employers, unions, and the workers they represent. These doctrines—the duty of fair representation, exclusivity, good-faith bargaining, captive-audience speech, and rights of equal access—are all component threads to a tapestry designed to facilitate widespread organizing and collective bargaining.…

Multi-Parent Custody

February 21, 2024

By Jessica Feinberg. Full Text. In recent years, a number of jurisdictions have enacted laws recognizing that a child may have more than two legal parents (multi-parentage). Recognition of multi-parentage represents a significant change to the legal framework governing parentage— for most of U.S. history, it was well established that a child could have a…

Notes

Throuples and Family Law

February 21, 2024

By Philip de Sa e Silva. Full Text. As throuples and other forms of polyamorous relationships gain visibility and acceptance, courts will have to confront the legal issues that will likely arise when a throuple forms and when it dissolves. How should courts determine child custody for three equally situated parents? How should courts divide…

In Defense of Pickering: When a Public Employee’s Social Media Speech, Particularly Political Speech, Conflicts with Their Employer’s Public Service

February 21, 2024

By Abby Ward. Full Text. With the rise of social media and the United States’ increasing political polarization, public employees take to social media to post about political issues such as race and policing. But when public employees make posts on political issues in an inflammatory or controversial way, public employers often discipline or fire…

Headnotes

AI Tools for Lawyers: A Practical Guide

October 27, 2023

By Daniel Schwarcz & Jonathan H. Choi. Full Text. This Article provides practical and specific guidance on how to effectively use AI large language models (LLMs), like GPT-4, Bing Chat, and Bard, in legal research and writing. Focusing on GPT-4—the most advanced LLM that is…

Property as a Legitimating Right

November 21, 2023

By Duncan Hosie. Full Text. Recent decisions from the Roberts Court have strengthened property rights, and progressive commentators and jurists have reacted with alarm. In light of these constitutional developments, this Essay revisits the landmark 2003 case of Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, which…

Still on the Hook: Forward-Looking Releases Reel-in Potential Risks in Mergers and Acquisitions

December 20, 2023

By Mark T. Wilhelm & Madison Fitzgerald. Full Text. A recent study that analyzed more than 2,100 private-target acquisitions found that 65% of those transactions were structured with a separate signing and closing. While the number of days between signing and closing inevitably varies on…

The Right to Counsel for Habeas Proceedings

December 21, 2023

By Amy Cohen. Full Text. Federal habeas is often the last avenue of relief for both federal and state prisoners. The Framers thought the right to the writ of habeas corpus was so established in law that its only reference in the Constitution is under…

De Novo Blog

Case Comment: Bhogaita v. Altamonte

July 29, 2015

EVERY DOG CAN HAVE HIS DAY IN COURT: THE USE OF ANIMALS AS DEMONSTRATIVE EXHIBITS By: Kyle R. Kroll, Volume 100 Online Managing Editor In Bhogaita v. Altamonte, the Eleventh Circuit recently decided whether to allow a dog in the courtroom as a demonstrative exhibit.[1]…

Revisiting Water Bankruptcy

July 14, 2015

REVISITING WATER BANKRUPTCY IN CALIFORNIA’S FOURTH YEAR OF DROUGHT By Olivia Moe, Volume 100Managing Editor This spring, as “extreme” to “exceptional” drought stretched across most of California—indicating that a four-year streak of drought was not about to resolve itself[1]—Governor Jerry Brown issued an unprecedented order…

Defying Auer Deference

June 24, 2015

DEFYING AUER DEFERENCE: SKIDMORE AS A SOLUTION TO CONSERVATIVE CONCERNS IN PEREZ v. MORTGAGE BANKERS ASSOCIATION By: Nicholas R. Bednar, Volume 100 Lead Articles Editor* On March 9, 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States handed down its decision in Perez v. Mortgage Bankers…

Patent Reform Primer

March 31, 2015

WHAT’S UNDER THE BRIDGE? A PATENT REFORM PRIMER By Ann E. Motl, Volume 99 Online Managing Editor Just a few years after passing the most sweeping changes in patent law since 1952, Congress is considering patent reform again.[1] Whereas the America Invents Act of 2011…

Rumble v. Fairview Health

March 31, 2015

RUMBLE V. FAIRVIEW HEALTH SERVICES: FEDERAL JUDGE HOLDS THAT THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT’S FRANKENSTEIN CIVIL RIGHTS PROVISION PROTECTS TRANSGENDER INDIVIDUALS By: Leah Tabbert, Volume 99 Staff Member The federal judiciary has spent years teasing apart and examining the many provisions of the Patient Protection and…

FAA’s Commercial Drone Quandary

March 26, 2015

THE FAA’S AMAZON EXEMPTION SIGNALS A COMMERCIAL DRONE QUANDARY ON THE HORIZON By: Maxwell Mensinger, Volume 99 Staff Member Last week, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) granted Amazon a much anticipated but highly restrictive license to test its drone delivery program. The event prompted various…