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Teaching “Is This Case Rightly Decided?”

By Steven Arrigg Koh | April 15, 2024

By Steven Arrigg Koh. Full Text. “Is this case rightly decided?” From the first week of law school, every law student must grapple with this classroom question. This Essay argues that this vital question is problematically under-specified, creating imprecision in thinking about law. This Essay thus advocates that law professors should present students with a…

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Article

Profit, Mission, and Protest at Work

By Marion Crain | May 22, 2024

By MARION CRAIN. Full Text. The classic understanding of capitalism maintains that the social responsibility of business is to increase its profits. But in the last decade, many firms have announced commitments to various social justice issues, folding them into corporate mission statements, codes of corporate social responsibility, and branding. Firms engaging in so-called “woke…

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Article

Sound Marks

By Deborah R. Gerhardt and Jon J. Lee | May 22, 2024

By DEBORAH R. GERHARDT and JON J. LEE. Full Text. A lion roars just before a film rolls. A doughboy giggles. A giant green man laughs a hearty, “Ho, Ho, Ho.” These iconic sounds are all federally registered as trademarks. They identify specific brands and distinguish their products and services from the competition. Human brains…

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Article

“Criminalizing” Depositions in Arbitration

By Mitch Zamoff | May 22, 2024

By MITCH ZAMOFF. Full Text. Civil litigation–style deposition practice is preventing commercial arbitration from reaching its full potential as an economical, efficient alternative to a civil lawsuit. Although there is consensus among alternative dispute resolution experts that meaningful limits must be imposed on arbitration discovery to unlock the efficiency benefits of arbitration, depositions continue to…

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Article

Reproductive Objectification

By Meghan M. Boone and Benjamin J. McMichael | May 22, 2024

By MEGHAN M. BOONE and BENJAMIN J. MCMICHAEL. Full Text. The American system of rights is individualized—premised on the concept of singular, physically separate, and autonomous people. The rise of the fetal personhood movement complicates this basic understanding. If rights attach to singular, autonomous people, and fetuses are legally people, then the body of a…

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Article

Police-Made Law

By Brenner M. Fissell | May 22, 2024

By BRENNER M. FISSELL. Full Text. This Article presents evidence that police are writing laws that they enforce. This newly discovered phenomenon compounds the existing understanding of police “making” law through the exercise of discretion. They make law in a far more direct way, functioning as quasi-legislators at the local level—identifying a social problem, drafting…

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Note

Answering the Call: How Reconfiguration of the Nation’s Mental Health Crisis Call Line Can Facilitate Reimagination of Community Well-Being and Public Safety

By Lucy Chin | May 22, 2024

By LUCY CHIN. Full Text. When the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline went live in Summer 2022, communities across the country began to confront the question of how this new, expanded behavioral health resource would integrate into the country’s preexisting, emergency response systems. The program seemed to promise the solution to an increasingly visible problem—as…

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Note

The Mississippi River Basin Compact: A New Governance Structure to Save the Mississippi River

By John Stack | May 22, 2024

By JOHN STACK. Full Text. The Mississippi River is one of the most significant and yet one of the most imperiled water bodies in the United States. It faces a myriad of problems, from rampant pollution, widespread flooding, wildlife habitat loss, and considerable droughts. Indeed, this is a critical time for the Mississippi River. Fall…

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Note

States’ Obligation to Provide for Trans Youth: How Medicaid Requires (Most) States to Provide Access to Puberty Blockers

By Grace Worcester | May 22, 2024

By GRACE WORCESTER. Full Text. Over the last few years, many states have endeavored to strip minor access to gender-affirming healthcare, and these efforts have seen considerable success. By the end of 2023, twenty-two states had enacted legislation that limits youth access to gender- affirming healthcare. In line with these efforts, many states have created…

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Headnote

Erasing Racial Harms in CFPB v. Community Financial Services Association

By Callan Showers | May 29, 2024

By Callan Showers. Full Text. Professor Allan Freeman’s “perpetrator perspective” explains the normative American legal framework that casts racism as an intentional deviation from an otherwise neutral system. Freeman describes the perpetrator perspective as a negative, remedial dimension casting discrimination as an isolated action by a perpetrator onto a victim. By conflating the concept of…

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Articles, Essays, & Tributes

Profit, Mission, and Protest at Work

May 22, 2024

By MARION CRAIN. Full Text. The classic understanding of capitalism maintains that the social responsibility of business is to increase its profits. But in the last decade, many firms have announced commitments to various social justice issues, folding them into corporate mission statements, codes of corporate social responsibility, and branding. Firms engaging in so-called “woke…

Sound Marks

May 22, 2024

By DEBORAH R. GERHARDT and JON J. LEE. Full Text. A lion roars just before a film rolls. A doughboy giggles. A giant green man laughs a hearty, “Ho, Ho, Ho.” These iconic sounds are all federally registered as trademarks. They identify specific brands and distinguish their products and services from the competition. Human brains…

“Criminalizing” Depositions in Arbitration

May 22, 2024

By MITCH ZAMOFF. Full Text. Civil litigation–style deposition practice is preventing commercial arbitration from reaching its full potential as an economical, efficient alternative to a civil lawsuit. Although there is consensus among alternative dispute resolution experts that meaningful limits must be imposed on arbitration discovery to unlock the efficiency benefits of arbitration, depositions continue to…

Reproductive Objectification

May 22, 2024

By MEGHAN M. BOONE and BENJAMIN J. MCMICHAEL. Full Text. The American system of rights is individualized—premised on the concept of singular, physically separate, and autonomous people. The rise of the fetal personhood movement complicates this basic understanding. If rights attach to singular, autonomous people, and fetuses are legally people, then the body of a…

Police-Made Law

May 22, 2024

By BRENNER M. FISSELL. Full Text. This Article presents evidence that police are writing laws that they enforce. This newly discovered phenomenon compounds the existing understanding of police “making” law through the exercise of discretion. They make law in a far more direct way, functioning as quasi-legislators at the local level—identifying a social problem, drafting…

Notes

Answering the Call: How Reconfiguration of the Nation’s Mental Health Crisis Call Line Can Facilitate Reimagination of Community Well-Being and Public Safety

May 22, 2024

By LUCY CHIN. Full Text. When the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline went live in Summer 2022, communities across the country began to confront the question of how this new, expanded behavioral health resource would integrate into the country’s preexisting, emergency response systems. The program seemed to promise the solution to an increasingly visible problem—as…

States’ Obligation to Provide for Trans Youth: How Medicaid Requires (Most) States to Provide Access to Puberty Blockers

May 22, 2024

By GRACE WORCESTER. Full Text. Over the last few years, many states have endeavored to strip minor access to gender-affirming healthcare, and these efforts have seen considerable success. By the end of 2023, twenty-two states had enacted legislation that limits youth access to gender- affirming healthcare. In line with these efforts, many states have created…

Headnotes

Thirty-Five Years of Inaction: The Unfulfilled Promise of the Medicaid Equal Access Provision

March 2, 2024

By Delaram Takyar. Full Text. In 1989, Congress amended the Social Security Act to ensure that Medicaid recipients would have the same access to medical providers as people covered by private insurance and Medicare. This was meant to remedy the wide disparities in access to…

Teaching “Is This Case Rightly Decided?”

April 15, 2024

By Steven Arrigg Koh. Full Text. “Is this case rightly decided?” From the first week of law school, every law student must grapple with this classroom question. This Essay argues that this vital question is problematically under-specified, creating imprecision in thinking about law. This Essay…

Erasing Racial Harms in CFPB v. Community Financial Services Association

May 29, 2024

By Callan Showers. Full Text. Professor Allan Freeman’s “perpetrator perspective” explains the normative American legal framework that casts racism as an intentional deviation from an otherwise neutral system. Freeman describes the perpetrator perspective as a negative, remedial dimension casting discrimination as an isolated action by…

Should Courts Make It Personal? Virtue-Dependent Doctrine and the Law of Executive Power

May 29, 2024

By Michael Coenen. Full Text. With The Virtuous Executive, Professor Alan Rozenshtein has given us an impressive and wide-ranging analysis of the relevance of Presidential character to the law of executive power. The article’s central claim is straightforward: The Constitution reflects a “commitment to proper…

Private-Law Attorneys General

May 29, 2024

By Molly Shaffer Van Houweling. Full Text. The Constitution empowers Congress to “promote the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries.” The founding-era Congress quickly exercised this power…

Twins at Bat(son), Strikes Are Out: Minnesota’s Opportunity to Restore Batson v. Kentucky by Eliminating Peremptory Strikes

May 29, 2024

By Samuel Buisman. Full Text. While the Supreme Court’s decision in Batson v. Kentucky is widely hailed by scholars and jurists alike as a triumph of American egalitarianism, time and trial have unmasked its protections as a paper tiger. Despite its purported protections against racially…

American Fiction: Overturning the Doctrine of Immigration Entry Fiction as Established in Shaughnessy v. Mezei

May 29, 2024

By Dahlia Wilson. Full Text. In 1886, the Supreme Court decided a case called Yick Wo v. Hopkins, which held that any person physically within the United States’ territory would enjoy the protections of the Fourteenth Amendment, regardless of their immigration or citizenship status. In…

Bounded Entities and (Some of) Their Discontents

May 29, 2024

By Saurabh Vishnubhakat. Full Text.  In his new article An Organizational Theory of International Technology Transfer, Professor Peter Lee offers two richly detailed accounts at once. One is a novel theoretical framework of “bounded entities” that generalizes both from the classic theory of the firm…

De Novo Blog

FAA’s Commercial Drone Quandary

March 26, 2015

THE FAA’S AMAZON EXEMPTION SIGNALS A COMMERCIAL DRONE QUANDARY ON THE HORIZON By: Maxwell Mensinger, Volume 99 Staff Member Last week, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) granted Amazon a much anticipated but highly restrictive license to test its drone delivery program. The event prompted various…